Michael Platt

Michael Platt
  • James S. Riepe University Professor
  • Professor of Marketing
  • Professor of Psychology
  • Professor of Neuroscience

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    745 Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    3730 Walnut Street
    University of Pennsylvania
    Philadelphia, PA 19104-6304

Overview

Michael Platt has been selected as the sixteenth Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor, effective July 1, 2015.
Platt, a neuroscientist whose work focuses on the brain’s decision-making processes, has appointments in the Department of Neuroscience in the Perelman School of Medicine, the Department of Psychology in the School of Arts and Sciences, and the Department of Marketing in the Wharton School.
Platt has served as Professor of Neurobiology, Director of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences and Director of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at Duke University. Organizations such as the National Foundation, the Klingenstein Foundation, the McDonnell Foundation and the Department of Defense have supported his research, and he has been recognized in the New York Times, the Washington post, the Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, A`BC, BBC and PBS.
Platt has also served as the President of the Society for Neuroeconomics. He holds a PhD in Biological Anthropology from Penn, and a BA in Biological Anthropology from Yale.
 
VIDEOS (SELECTED)
How We Decide: The New Science of Neuroeconomics,” Penn Arts & Sciences 60-second Lectures, April 27, 2016
Why Friendship Is One of Our Most Basic Needs,” Huffington Post, February 24, 2016
Brain Power,” World Economic Forum, February 23, 2016
This Is Your Brain on Decision-making,” Knowledge@Wharton, October 29, 2015
Primates of the Caribbean,” ARTE Network, France, 2013
The NeuroEconomics of Innovation,” California Academy of Sciences, April 25, 2013
The Science of Friendship,” Ignite Philly, April 27, 2016
Peacocks, Eye Tracking, and the Brains Behind Decisions,” Penn Current, March 29, 2017
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Teaching

Current Courses (Fall 2022)

  • MKTG2370 - Brain Science F/business

    This course provides an overview of contemporary brain science and its applications to business. Students are first rapidly introduced to the basic anatomy and physiology of the brain and become familiar with important techniques for measuring and manipulating brain function. The course then surveys major findings in neuroscience with applications to business, including vision, attention and advertising; valuation and marketing; decision making; learning, innovation and creativity; social influence, team-building, and leadership; and discussion of the ethical, legal, and societal implications of applying neuroscience to business. Applications to business, education, sports, law, and policy are discussed throughout.

    MKTG2370001 ( Syllabus )

  • MKTG7370 - Brain Science F/business

    This course provides an overview of contemporary brain science and its applications to business. Students are first rapidly introduced to the basic anatomy and physiology of the brain and become familiar with important techniques for measuring and manipulating brain function. The course then surveys major findings in neuroscience with applications to business, including vision, attention and advertising; valuation and marketing; decision making; learning, innovation and creativity; social influence, team-building, and leadership; and discussion of the ethical, legal, and societal implications of applying neuroscience to business. Applications to business, education, sports, law, and policy are discussed throughout.

    MKTG7370001 ( Syllabus )

All Courses

  • ANTH3999 - Independent Study

    A study under faculty supervision of a problem area or topic not included in the formal curriculum.

  • BDS5990 - Capstone Experience

    The new capstone experience consists of two semesters where students are invited to engage in a dialogue with industry to understand the landscape of the field of Behavioral Sciences, and use the tools learned in MBDS courses to tackle specific industry problems. In the first semester (Fall), students engaged in a conversation with industry leaders that provided them with first-hand knowledge of a) how behavioral science is applied in organizations across several domains, b) why BeSci insights and tools are becoming increasingly relevant in organizational settings, and c) what MBDS graduates can expect when they finally get to the job market. In the Spring, students will participate in professional development workshops as they embark on a Design Challenge, when, in teams, they will have a chance to use instructional and strategic input from these conversations to shape their work. Our goal is to prepare our students to engage with industry and global organizations as soon as they complete the program.

  • COGS3998 - Senior Thesis

    This course is a directed study intended for cognitive science majors who have been admitted to the cognitive science honors program. Upon admission into the program, students may register for this course under the direction of their thesis supervisor.

  • COGS3999 - Independent Study

    Departmental permission required

  • MKTG2370 - Brain Science F/Business

    This course provides an overview of contemporary brain science and its applications to business. Students are first rapidly introduced to the basic anatomy and physiology of the brain and become familiar with important techniques for measuring and manipulating brain function. The course then surveys major findings in neuroscience with applications to business, including vision, attention and advertising; valuation and marketing; decision making; learning, innovation and creativity; social influence, team-building, and leadership; and discussion of the ethical, legal, and societal implications of applying neuroscience to business. Applications to business, education, sports, law, and policy are discussed throughout.

  • MKTG3990 - Independent Study

  • MKTG7370 - Brain Science F/Business

    This course provides an overview of contemporary brain science and its applications to business. Students are first rapidly introduced to the basic anatomy and physiology of the brain and become familiar with important techniques for measuring and manipulating brain function. The course then surveys major findings in neuroscience with applications to business, including vision, attention and advertising; valuation and marketing; decision making; learning, innovation and creativity; social influence, team-building, and leadership; and discussion of the ethical, legal, and societal implications of applying neuroscience to business. Applications to business, education, sports, law, and policy are discussed throughout.

  • MKTG8990 - Independent Study

    A student contemplating an independent study project must first find a faculty member who agrees to supervise and approve the student's written proposal as an independent study (MKTG 899). If a student wishes the proposed work to be used to meet the ASP requirement, he/she should then submit the approved proposal to the MBA adviser who will determine if it is an appropriate substitute. Such substitutions will only be approved prior to the beginning of the semester.

  • NGG9950 - Dissertation

  • NRSC3999 - Independent Research

    Individual research of an experimental nature with a member of the standing faculty leading to a written paper. The grade is based primarily on a serious term paper describing original research carried out by the student. Students must submit a proposal prior to registering. During the semester, students must attend two seminars to discuss planning and independent research project, ethical concerns in research and writing a scientific paper. Attendance at the meetings is mandatory. Students doing more than one credit of independent study will be required to present a poster at the annual Student Research Symposium.

  • NRSC4999 - Adv Independent Research

    Continuation of NRSC 3999 research. Students will be required to attend weekly Honors Seminar meetings and give an oral presentation of their research at the annual Student Research Symposium.

  • PPE3999 - Independent Study

    Student arranges with a faculty member to pursue a research project on a suitable topic. For more information about research and setting up independent studies, visit: https://ppe.sas.upenn.edu/study/curriculum/independent-studies

  • PSYC3100 - Being Human

    This course will examine the biological basis of human behavior and culture as an emergent product of the brain and its interactions with the physical and social environment. As we explore this topic, we will emphasize human brain function at the level of neural systems and the neural networks they supply, how these systems may have evolved, how they change depending on experience, and what dysfunction of these circuits as occurs in neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopment disorders reveals about human thought and behavior. We will focus on key features of human nature, including language, mathematics, creativity and innovation, empathy, strategic thinking, cooperation, deception, economic behavior, and technology, amongst others.

  • PSYC4998 - Mentored Research

    Mentored research involving data collection. Students do independent empirical work under the supervision of a faculty member, leading to a written paper. Normally taken in the junior or senior year.

  • PSYC4999 - Honors Mentored Research

    The Honors Program has been developed to recognize excellence in psychology among Penn undergraduates and to enhance skills related to psychological research. The 4998 credit signifies an Honors Independent Study, completed as part of the Honors Program. The honors program involves: (a) completing a year-long empirical research project in your senior year under the supervision of a faculty member (for a letter grade). This earns 2 cu's. (b) completing a second term of statistics (for a letter grade) before graduation. (c) participating in the year-long Senior Honors seminar (for a letter grade). This seminar is designed especially for Psychology Honors majors; this receives a total of 1 cu. (d) participating in the Undergraduate Psychology Research Fair in the Spring semester, at which honors students present a poster and give a 15-minute talk about their research. (e) a total of 15 cu's in psychology is required. Students will be selected to be part of the Honors Program in the Spring of their junior year (see application process online)

  • PSYC6999 - Indiv Res for 1st Yr Grd

    Individual Research for First-Year Graduate Students

  • PSYC9999 - Independent Study

    Individual Study and Research

  • VISR6990 - Independent Study

    This course enables student to undertake a self-directed study on a topic in Veterinary Medicine, under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are required to submit an Independent Study & Research (ISR) application to the Registrar Manager in the Office for Students. Credit may vary.

In the News

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In the News

Perspective Taking: A Brain Hack That Can Help You Make Better Decisions

Wharton marketing professor and neuroscientist Michael Platt and his co-authors explain the neural basis of perspective taking and why it may lead to more innovation and better business outcomes. Read More

Knowledge at Wharton - 3/22/2021
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Wharton’s Global Impact: From Phoenix to Kuala Lumpur
Wharton Magazine - 04/15/2022

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A blue graphic with various political images such as raised hands, scales, and person speaking at a podium.What Neuroscience Can Tell Us About Political Advertising

One of the big stories out of the 2020 election cycle is the amount  Democratic presidential candidates have spent on political advertising. Michael Bloomberg has reportedly spent more than $410 million on campaign ads, and has since dropped out of the race, whereas former Vice President Joe Biden has only…

Wharton Stories - 03/10/2020
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