Gideon Nave

Gideon Nave
  • Assistant Professor of Marketing

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    749 Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    3730 Walnut Street
    University of Pennsylvania
    Philadelphia, PA 19104-6304

Links: CV

Overview

Professor Nave’s research uses a medley of quantitative and experimental methods from the fields of Computational Neuroscience, Cognitive Psychology, Game Theory, and Machine Learning, for reverse-engineering the decision-making process in humans.

Nave’s research was published in top academic journals such as Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Management Science, and Journal of Marketing Research.

Nave holds a PhD in Computation & Neural Systems from Caltech. He completed his B.Sc and M.Sc in Electrical Engineering at the Technion – Israel institute of technology, specializing in Signal Processing.

More information is available in Gideon’s personal page and his blog.

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Research

  • Colin Camerer, Anna Dreber, Felix Holzmeister, Teck H. Ho, Jurgen Huber, Magnus Johannesson, Michael Kirchler, Gideon Nave, Brian Nosek, Thomas Pfeiffer (2018), Evaluating the replicability of social science experiments in Nature and Science between 2010 and 2015, Nature Human Behaviour.

    Abstract: Being able to replicate scientific findings is crucial for scientific progress. We replicate 21 systematically selected experimental studies in the social sciences published in Nature and Science between 2010 and 2015. The replications follow analysis plans reviewed by the original authors and pre-registered prior to the replications. The replications are high powered, with sample sizes on average about five times higher than in the original studies. We find a significant effect in the same direction as the original study for 13 (62%) studies, and the effect size of the replications is on average about 50% of the original effect size. Replicability varies between 12 (57%) and 14 (67%) studies for complementary replicability indicators. Consistent with these results, the estimated true-positive rate is 67% in a Bayesian analysis. The relative effect size of true positives is estimated to be 71%, suggesting that both false positives and inflated effect sizes of true positives contribute to imperfect reproducibility. Furthermore, we find that peer beliefs of replicability are strongly related to replicability, suggesting that the research community could predict which results would replicate and that failures to replicate were not the result of chance alone.

  • Gideon Nave (2018), Single-dose testosterone administration increases men’s preference for status goods, Nature Communications.

    Abstract: In modern human cultures where social hierarchies are ubiquitous, people typically signal their hierarchical position through consumption of positional goods—goods that convey one’s social position, such as luxury products. Building on animal research and early correlational human studies linking the sex steroid hormone testosterone with hierarchical social interactions, we investigate the influence of testosterone on men’s preferences for positional goods. Using a placebo-controlled experiment (N = 243) to measure individuals’ desire for status brands and products, we find that administering testosterone increases men’s preference for status brands, compared to brands of similar perceived quality but lower perceived status. Furthermore, testosterone increases positive attitudes toward positional goods when they are described as status-enhancing, but not when they are described as power-enhancing or high in quality. Our results provide novel causal evidence for the biological roots of men’s preferences for status, bridging decades of animal behavioral studies with contemporary consumer research.

  • Gideon Nave, Juri Minxha, David Greenberg, Michal Kosinski, David Stillwell, Jason Rentfrow (2018), Musical Preferences Predict Personality: Evidence from Active Listening and Facebook Likes, Psychological Science.

    Abstract: Research over the past decade has shown that various personality traits are communicated through musical preferences. One limitation of that research is external validity, as most studies have assessed individual differences in musical preferences using self-reports of music-genre preferences. Are personality traits communicated through behavioral manifestations of musical preferences? We address this question in two large-scale online studies with demographically diverse populations. Study 1 (N=22,252) shows that reactions to unfamiliar musical excerpts predicted individual differences in personality - most notably openness and extraversion - above and beyond demographic characteristics. Moreover, these personality traits were differentially associated with particular music-preference dimensions. The results from Study 2 (N=21,929) replicated and extended these findings by showing that an active measure of naturally-occurring behavior, Facebook Likes for musical artists, also predicted individual differences in personality. In general, our findings establish the robustness and external validity of the links between musical preferences and personality.

  • Anoop Menon, Gideon Nave, Sudeep Bhatia (Working), Volatility-Induced Emotions Impact Mergers and Acquisitions by S&P 500 Executives.

    Abstract: Risky decisions are at the heart of strategic managerial practice, and research suggests that they might be susceptible to emotional influences. However, the association between emotions and real-world high-stakes decisions made by experienced managers is questionable, because most work to date on the topic has relied on laboratory experiments conducted on college students, and as the capacity to measure emotions in the field has been limited. This work addresses the void in the literature by examining the relationship between emotional expressions of executives of S&P 500 companies (the largest 500 publicly traded firms on the NYSE) and subsequent risky decisions about whether to conduct mergers and acquisitions (M&A), in a large panel dataset. By performing text-based sentiment analysis on the quarterly earnings conference calls of these firms (N = 15,555 calls, conducted between 2005-2016), we reveal that the expression of negative emotions predicts less risk taking by the firms, as reflected by fewer M&A deals (controlling for fundamental financial variables, firm- and year-level effects). The relationship between emotions and M&A decisions is driven by the expression of sadness and fear, emotions that involve appraisals of uncertainty and lack of control, and less by expressions of anger (which involves appraisals of certainty and control), in line with the predictions of exiting theories of emotion and risk taking. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for managerial practice and highlight limitations and avenues for future research.

  • Colin Camerer, Gideon Nave, Alec Smith (2018), Dynamic unstructured bargaining with private information: theory, experiment, and outcome prediction via machine learning, Management Science.

    Abstract: We study dynamic unstructured bargaining with deadlines and one-sided private information about the amount available to share (the “pie size"). Using mechanism design theory, we show that given the players’ incentives, the equilibrium incidence of bargaining failures (“strikes”) should increase with the pie size, and we derive a condition under which strikes are efficient. In our setting, no equilibrium satisfies both equality and efficiency in all pie sizes. We derive two equilibria that resolve the trade-off between equality and efficiency by either favoring equality or favoring efficiency. Using a novel experimental paradigm, we confirm that strike incidence is decreasing in the pie size. Subjects reach equal splits in small pie games (in which strikes are efficient), while most payoffs are close to either the efficient or the equal equilibrium prediction, when the pie is large. We employ a machine learning approach to show that bargaining process features recorded early in the game improve out of sample prediction of disagreements at the deadline. The process feature predictions are as accurate as predictions from pie sizes only, and adding process and pie data together improves predictions even more.

  • Sandra Matz, Michal Kosinski, Gideon Nave, David Stillwell (2017), Psychological targeting as an effective approach to digital mass persuasion, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

    Abstract: People are exposed to persuasive communication across many different contexts: Governments, companies, and political parties use persuasive appeals to encourage people to eat healthier, purchase a particular product, or vote for a specific candidate. Laboratory studies show that such persuasive appeals are more effective in influencing behavior when they are tailored to individuals’ unique psychological characteristics. However, the investigation of large-scale psychological persuasion in the real world has been hindered by the questionnaire-based nature of psychological assessment. Recent research, however, shows that people’s psychological characteristics can be accurately predicted from their digital footprints, such as their Facebook Likes or Tweets. Capitalizing on this form of psychological assessment from digital footprints, we test the effects of psychological persuasion on people’s actual behavior in an ecologically valid setting. In three field experiments that reached over 3.5 million individuals with psychologically tailored advertising, we find that matching the content of persuasive appeals to individuals’ psychological characteristics significantly altered their behavior as measured by clicks and purchases. Persuasive appeals that were matched to people’s extraversion or openness-to-experience level resulted in up to 40% more clicks and up to 50% more purchases than their mismatching or unpersonalized counterparts. Our findings suggest that the application of psychological targeting makes it possible to influence the behavior of large groups of people by tailoring persuasive appeals to the psychological needs of the target audiences. We discuss both the potential benefits of this method for helping individuals make better decisions and the potential pitfalls related to manipulation and privacy.

  • Gideon Nave, Amos Nadler, Colin Camerer, David Zava (2017), Single dose testosterone administration impairs cognitive reflection in men, Psychological Science.

  • Cary Frydman and Gideon Nave (2016), Extrapolative Beliefs in Perceptual and Economic Decisions: Evidence of a Common Mechanism, Management Science.

  • Marcel Lichters, Claudia Brunnlieb, Gideon Nave, Marko Sarstedt, Bodo Vogt (2016), The influence of serotonin deficiency on choice deferral and the compromise effect, Journal of Marketing Research.

  • Colin Camerer, Anna Dreber, Teck Ho, Eskil Forsell, Jurgen Huber, Michael Kirchler, Gideon Nave (2016), Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics, Science.

Teaching

Past Courses

  • MKTG212 - DATA & ANLZ FOR MKTG DEC

    Firms have access to detailed data of customers and past marketing actions. Such data may include in-store and online customer transactions, customer surveys as well as prices and advertising. Using real-world applications from various industries, the goal of the course is to familiarize students with several types of managerial problems as well as data sources and techniques, commonly employed in making effective marketing decisions. The course would involve formulating critical managerial problems, developing relevant hypotheses, analyzing data and, most importantly, drawing inferences and telling convincing narratives, with a view of yielding actionable results.

  • MKTG712 - DATA & ANLZ FOR MKTG DEC

    Firms have access to detailed data of customers and past marketing actions. Such data may include in-store and online customer transactions, customer surveys as well as prices and advertising. Using real-world applications from various industries, the goal of the course is to familiarize students with several types of managerial problems as well as data sources and techniques, commonly employed in making effective marketing decisions. The course would involve formulating critical managerial problems, developing relevant hypotheses, analyzing data and, most importantly, drawing inferences and telling convincing narratives, with a view of yielding actionable results.

In the News

Knowledge @ Wharton

Activity

Latest Research

Colin Camerer, Anna Dreber, Felix Holzmeister, Teck H. Ho, Jurgen Huber, Magnus Johannesson, Michael Kirchler, Gideon Nave, Brian Nosek, Thomas Pfeiffer (2018), Evaluating the replicability of social science experiments in Nature and Science between 2010 and 2015, Nature Human Behaviour.
All Research

In the News

Is There a Replication Crisis in Research?

A recent study co-led by Wharton's Gideon Nave attempted to replicate social science experiments published in top journals, with mixed results.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/10/12
All News