Stefano Puntoni

Stefano Puntoni
  • Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing
  • Professor of Marketing
  • Co-Director, Wharton Human-Centered Technology Initiative

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    760 Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    3730 Walnut Street
    University of Pennsylvania
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: New Technologies in Marketing, Technology Adoption, Brand Management, Consumer Decision Making

Links: CV

Overview

Stefano Puntoni is the Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing at The Wharton School. Prior to joining Penn, Stefano was a professor of marketing and head of department at the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University, in the Netherlands. He holds a PhD in marketing from London Business School and a degree in Statistics and Economics from the University of Padova, in his native Italy.

His research has appeared in several leading journals, including Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of Marketing, Nature Human Behavior, and Management Science. He also writes regularly for managerial outlets such as Harvard Business Review and MIT Sloan Management Review. Most of his ongoing research investigates how new technology is changing consumption and society.

He is a former MSI Young Scholar and MSI Scholar, and the winner of several grants and awards. He is currently an Associate Editor at the Journal of Consumer Research and at the Journal of Marketing. Stefano teaches in the areas of marketing strategy, new technologies, brand management, and decision making.

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Research

CV

Teaching

Current Courses (Spring 2023)

  • MKTG9520 - Information Processing A

    The purpose of this seminar is to provide graduate students with a solid foundation for critical thinking and research in psychology and marketing on information processing related topics. Topics of discussion include consumer knowledge (learning, memory and categorization), attitude theory, persuasion, affect and social influence. The course draws from the literature in marketing, psychology and economics. The course will enable students to conceptualize, operationalize, and develop research ideas. Therefore, the focus is on understanding theoretical and methodological approaches to various aspects of consumer behavior, as well as advancing this knowledge by developing testable hypotheses and theoretical perspectives that build on the current knowledge base.

    MKTG9520301

  • MKTG2780 - Strategic Brand Mgmt

    Which brands make you happy? Apple? Amazon? Starbucks? Everlane? Soulcycle? Sweetgreen? What draws you into these brands? How do companies create compelling brand experiences? How could you cultivate a well-loved brand? This course explores such questions with the goal of identifying the ingredients for building an inspired brand. The course is created for students interested in building a brand and/or immersing themselves in the enhancement of an existing brand, and it is comprised of lectures, cases, guest speakers, discussions, in and out of class exercises, and a final project. Broadly, the course will be divided into four parts: 1) Understanding Brand, 2) Crafting Brand, 3) Measuring Brand, and 4) Managing Brand. The course will provide students with an appreciation of the role of branding and (taking a consumer-centric approach) will augment students' ability to think creatively and critically about the strategies and tactics involved in building, leveraging, defending, and sustaining inspired brands.

    MKTG2780001

  • MKTG3550 - Special Topic: Ai In Our Lives

    “AI in Our Lives: The Behavioral Science of Autonomous Technology” (or “AI in Our Lives” for short) takes a behavioral perspective on the topic of autonomous technology, such as Artificial Intelligence. It reviews new behavioral insights to help companies thrive in the dawning age of smart machines. We focus on both the behavior of consumers and how managers should make decisions about consumers. Related to the former, the emerging behavioral science of autonomous technology helps us understand barriers to consumer adoption and how to design captivating AI experiences. Related to the latter, we discuss how to improve decision-making with data and algorithms. This is a non-technical course. No coding or data science skills are required. The course uses interdisciplinary materials and a blend of pedagogical approaches, including interactive lectures, workshops, guest lectures, and case discussions. In addition to its many substantive insights, the course offers moments of reflection to help you understand how technology is changing our lives, and how each of us can help effect positive change in the world. The course bridges two perspectives. On one side, we acknowledge the tremendous value that autonomous technology can provide to firms and individual consumers. In many ways, automation defines progress. On the other side, we examine emerging risks for consumers in an AI-driven economy. The main theoretical lens will be offered by psychology, but we will also examine ideas from economics, management, history, statistics, computer science, art, sociology, and philosophy. The application contexts will be focused on marketing. While also relevant to other disciplines (e.g., operations, IT, innovation, or general management), this course is therefore especially suitable for students interested in a career in marketing (e.g., product management, brand management, service design, and customer experience management). The ultimate goal of the course is to help ensure that the amazing technologies currently being developed bring about positive change. The course will strive to achieve that by tackling the following UN Sustainable Development Goals: SDG9 (Innovation), SDG8 (Economic growth), SDG3 (Health and wellbeing), SDG10 (Reduced inequality), and SDG12 (Responsible consumption and production). The course complements the research activities of the new Wharton Human-Centered Technology Initiative.

    MKTG3550402

    MKTG3550401

  • MKTG8550 - Special Topics: Ai In Our Live

    “AI in Our Lives: The Behavioral Science of Autonomous Technology” (or “AI in Our Lives” for short) takes a behavioral perspective on the topic of autonomous technology, such as Artificial Intelligence. It reviews new behavioral insights to help companies thrive in the dawning age of smart machines. We focus on both the behavior of consumers and how managers should make decisions about consumers. Related to the former, the emerging behavioral science of autonomous technology helps us understand barriers to consumer adoption and how to design captivating AI experiences. Related to the latter, we discuss how to improve decision-making with data and algorithms. This is a non-technical course. No coding or data science skills are required. The course uses interdisciplinary materials and a blend of pedagogical approaches, including interactive lectures, workshops, guest lectures, and case discussions. In addition to its many substantive insights, the course offers moments of reflection to help you understand how technology is changing our lives, and how each of us can help effect positive change in the world. The course bridges two perspectives. On one side, we acknowledge the tremendous value that autonomous technology can provide to firms and individual consumers. In many ways, automation defines progress. On the other side, we examine emerging risks for consumers in an AI-driven economy. The main theoretical lens will be offered by psychology, but we will also examine ideas from economics, management, history, statistics, computer science, art, sociology, and philosophy. The application contexts will be focused on marketing. While also relevant to other disciplines (e.g., operations, IT, innovation, or general management), this course is therefore especially suitable for students interested in a career in marketing (e.g., product management, brand management, service design, and customer experience management). The ultimate goal of the course is to help ensure that the amazing technologies currently being developed bring about positive change. The course will strive to achieve that by tackling the following UN Sustainable Development Goals: SDG9 (Innovation), SDG8 (Economic growth), SDG3 (Health and wellbeing), SDG10 (Reduced inequality), and SDG12 (Responsible consumption and production). The course complements the research activities of the new Wharton Human-Centered Technology Initiative.

    MKTG8550401

    MKTG8550402

All Courses

  • MKTG2660 - Mktg For Social Impact

    Private and public sector firms increasingly use marketing strategies to engage their customers and stakeholders around social impact. To do so, managers need to understand how best to engage and influence customers to behave in ways that have positive social effects. This course focuses on the strategies for changing the behavior of a target segment of consumers on key issues in the public interest (e.g., health behaviors, energy efficiency, poverty reduction, fundraising for social causes). How managers partner with organizations (e.g., non-profits, government) to achieve social impact will also be explored.

  • MKTG2780 - Strategic Brand Mgmt

    Which brands make you happy? Apple? Amazon? Starbucks? Everlane? Soulcycle? Sweetgreen? What draws you into these brands? How do companies create compelling brand experiences? How could you cultivate a well-loved brand? This course explores such questions with the goal of identifying the ingredients for building an inspired brand. The course is created for students interested in building a brand and/or immersing themselves in the enhancement of an existing brand, and it is comprised of lectures, cases, guest speakers, discussions, in and out of class exercises, and a final project. Broadly, the course will be divided into four parts: 1) Understanding Brand, 2) Crafting Brand, 3) Measuring Brand, and 4) Managing Brand. The course will provide students with an appreciation of the role of branding and (taking a consumer-centric approach) will augment students' ability to think creatively and critically about the strategies and tactics involved in building, leveraging, defending, and sustaining inspired brands.

  • MKTG3550 - Special Topic: AI in Our Lives

    “AI in Our Lives: The Behavioral Science of Autonomous Technology” (or “AI in Our Lives” for short) takes a behavioral perspective on the topic of autonomous technology, such as Artificial Intelligence. It reviews new behavioral insights to help companies thrive in the dawning age of smart machines. We focus on both the behavior of consumers and how managers should make decisions about consumers. Related to the former, the emerging behavioral science of autonomous technology helps us understand barriers to consumer adoption and how to design captivating AI experiences. Related to the latter, we discuss how to improve decision-making with data and algorithms. This is a non-technical course. No coding or data science skills are required. The course uses interdisciplinary materials and a blend of pedagogical approaches, including interactive lectures, workshops, guest lectures, and case discussions. In addition to its many substantive insights, the course offers moments of reflection to help you understand how technology is changing our lives, and how each of us can help effect positive change in the world. The course bridges two perspectives. On one side, we acknowledge the tremendous value that autonomous technology can provide to firms and individual consumers. In many ways, automation defines progress. On the other side, we examine emerging risks for consumers in an AI-driven economy. The main theoretical lens will be offered by psychology, but we will also examine ideas from economics, management, history, statistics, computer science, art, sociology, and philosophy. The application contexts will be focused on marketing. While also relevant to other disciplines (e.g., operations, IT, innovation, or general management), this course is therefore especially suitable for students interested in a career in marketing (e.g., product management, brand management, service design, and customer experience management). The ultimate goal of the course is to help ensure that the amazing technologies currently being developed bring about positive change. The course will strive to achieve that by tackling the following UN Sustainable Development Goals: SDG9 (Innovation), SDG8 (Economic growth), SDG3 (Health and wellbeing), SDG10 (Reduced inequality), and SDG12 (Responsible consumption and production). The course complements the research activities of the new Wharton Human-Centered Technology Initiative.

  • MKTG8550 - Special Topics: AI In Our Live

    “AI in Our Lives: The Behavioral Science of Autonomous Technology” (or “AI in Our Lives” for short) takes a behavioral perspective on the topic of autonomous technology, such as Artificial Intelligence. It reviews new behavioral insights to help companies thrive in the dawning age of smart machines. We focus on both the behavior of consumers and how managers should make decisions about consumers. Related to the former, the emerging behavioral science of autonomous technology helps us understand barriers to consumer adoption and how to design captivating AI experiences. Related to the latter, we discuss how to improve decision-making with data and algorithms. This is a non-technical course. No coding or data science skills are required. The course uses interdisciplinary materials and a blend of pedagogical approaches, including interactive lectures, workshops, guest lectures, and case discussions. In addition to its many substantive insights, the course offers moments of reflection to help you understand how technology is changing our lives, and how each of us can help effect positive change in the world. The course bridges two perspectives. On one side, we acknowledge the tremendous value that autonomous technology can provide to firms and individual consumers. In many ways, automation defines progress. On the other side, we examine emerging risks for consumers in an AI-driven economy. The main theoretical lens will be offered by psychology, but we will also examine ideas from economics, management, history, statistics, computer science, art, sociology, and philosophy. The application contexts will be focused on marketing. While also relevant to other disciplines (e.g., operations, IT, innovation, or general management), this course is therefore especially suitable for students interested in a career in marketing (e.g., product management, brand management, service design, and customer experience management). The ultimate goal of the course is to help ensure that the amazing technologies currently being developed bring about positive change. The course will strive to achieve that by tackling the following UN Sustainable Development Goals: SDG9 (Innovation), SDG8 (Economic growth), SDG3 (Health and wellbeing), SDG10 (Reduced inequality), and SDG12 (Responsible consumption and production). The course complements the research activities of the new Wharton Human-Centered Technology Initiative.

  • MKTG9520 - Information Processing A

    The purpose of this seminar is to provide graduate students with a solid foundation for critical thinking and research in psychology and marketing on information processing related topics. Topics of discussion include consumer knowledge (learning, memory and categorization), attitude theory, persuasion, affect and social influence. The course draws from the literature in marketing, psychology and economics. The course will enable students to conceptualize, operationalize, and develop research ideas. Therefore, the focus is on understanding theoretical and methodological approaches to various aspects of consumer behavior, as well as advancing this knowledge by developing testable hypotheses and theoretical perspectives that build on the current knowledge base.

Awards and Honors

  • AMA TechSIG-Lazaridis Prize, 2022
  • Scientist in Residence, Experiments in Arts and Economics, ZKM Centre for Art and Media, Karlsruhe, 2021
  • Science Communication Grant, Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences, 2021
  • Case Centre’s Marketing Case Award, 2021
  • EFMD Case Writing Award, 2020
  • Case Centre’s Outstanding Case Writer Award, 2020
  • C.W. Park Award, Journal of Consumer Psychology, 2019
  • AMA-Sheth Doctoral Consortium Fellow, 2019 Description

    2013, 2015, 2018, 2019

  • MSI Scholar. Marketing Science Institute, 2018
  • Fellow, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), 2017
  • Research Grant, Marketing Science Institute, 2017
  • Outstanding Reviewer Award, International Journal of Research in Marketing, 2016
  • MSI Young Scholar. Marketing Science Institute, 2011
  • ERIM Research Award. Erasmus Research Institute of Management, 2010
  • Marie Curie Fellowship, 2006
  • EUR Fellowship, 2006
  • Emerald/EFMD Outstanding Doctoral Research Award, 2006
  • Ogilvy Foundation Research Grant, 2004-2005

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