Jehoshua Eliashberg

Jehoshua Eliashberg
  • Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing
  • Professor of Operations, Information and Decisions

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    744 Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    3730 Walnut Street
    University of Pennsylvania
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: marketing and strategic issues related to the entertainment and pharmaceutical industries, marketing research, marketing/operations/r&d interface, new product forecasting and planning models, new product planning and forecasting models, pricing

Links: CV, Google Scholar

Overview

Jehoshua (Josh) Eliashberg is the Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing and Professor of Operations, Information and Decisions at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He also held visiting scholar positions at the Business Schools of The University of Chicago, Chulalongkorn University (Bangkok, Thailand), Penn State University, INSEAD (Fontainebleau, France), Erasmus University (Rotterdam, The Netherlands), Singapore Management University, Carnegie-Mellon University, The University of British Columbia, UCLA, Time Inc., and at the Operations Research Department at AT&T Bell Laboratories.

Professor Eliashberg received a B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology at Haifa, an M.B.A. from Tel-Aviv University, and a doctoral degree in Decision Sciences and Marketing from Indiana University. He also received an Honorary Masters from the University of Pennsylvania.

Professor Eliashberg’s research interests are in developing models and methodologies to solve business problems. His research has focused on various issues including new product development and feasibility analysis, marketing/manufacturing/R&D interface, and competitive strategies. He has particular interest in the media and entertainment, pharmaceutical, and the hi-tech industries. He has authored numerous articles appearing in major academic journals. His work in the entertainment industry has been the subject of articles appearing in BusinessWeek, The Christian Science Monitor, The Financial Post, Financial Times, Forbes, Fortune, Los Angeles Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The New York Times, Variety, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post.

He has co-edited the books, Handbooks in Operations Research and Management Science: Marketing (with G. L. Lilien) and Managing Business Interfaces: Marketing, Engineering, and Manufacturing Perspectives (with Amiya K. Chakravarty). Professor Eliashberg has held various editorial positions in leading professional journals including: the Marketing Departmental Editor in Management Science, an Editorial Board member for Marketing Science, the European Journal of Operational Research, Marketing Letter, and Senior Editor for Manufacturing and Service Operations Management. He is currently the Series Editor of Springer’s International Series in Quantitative Marketing and the Editor-in-Chief of Foundations and Trends in Marketing. He was elected a Fellow of the INFORMS Society for Marketing Science for his contributions to the field in June 2010 and was named a Fellow of The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences in November 2010. His other professional services have included membership on the advisory boards of the National Science Foundation, the American Councils for International Education, and the academic liaison committee of the CMO Council.

Professor Eliashberg has been teaching the following courses at Wharton: Marketing Research; Models for Marketing Strategy; New Product Management; Design, Manufacturing, and Marketing Integration; and Analysis of the Media and Entertainment Industries. Prior to joining academia, he was employed for a number of years as an electronic engineer and marketing. He has participated extensively in various executive education programs. His executive education and consulting activities include AccentHealth, AstraZeneca, AT&T, Booz, Allen & Hamilton, Bell Atlantic, Campbell Soup, Cheil Communications, CTV Television Network (Canada), Domino’s Pizza, Franklin Mint, General Motors, Givaudan, HBO, IBM, Independence Blue Cross, Inmar, Janssen Pharmaceutica Inc., Johnson & Johnson, L G Electronics, Lucent Technologies, Multimedia Development Corp. (Malaysia), Pathe Cinema (Holland), Philip Morris, The Siam Cement Group (Thailand), Sirius Satellite Radio, Warner Home Video, Weave Innovations Inc., Woodside Travel Trust, and Wyeth/Pfizer Pharmaceuticals.

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Research

  • Grant Packard, Anocha Aribarg, Jehoshua Eliashberg, Natasha Foutz (2016), The Role of Network Embeddeness in Film Success, International Journal of Research in Marketing, 33 (2), pp. 328-342.

  • Jehoshua Eliashberg, Thorsten Hennig-Thurau, Charles B. Weinberg, Berend Wierenga (2016), Of Video Games, Music, Movies, and Celebrities, International Journal of Research in Marketing, 33 (2), pp. 241-245.

  • Jehoshua Eliashberg, Sam Hui, Z. John Zhang (2014), Assessing Box Office Performance Using Movie Scripts: A Kernel-based Approach, IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering, 26 (11), pp. 2639-2648.

  • Delphine Manceau, Jehoshua Eliashberg, Vithala R. Rao, Meng Su (2014), A Diffusion Model for Preannonced Products, Customer Needs and Solutions, 1 (1), pp. 77-89.

  • Min Ding, Songting Dong, Jehoshua Eliashberg, Arun Gopalakrishnan, Portfolio Management in New Drug Development (2014)

  • Mark A.A.M. Leenders and Jehoshua Eliashberg (2011), The Antecedents and Consequences of Restrictive Age-Based Ratings in the Global Motion Picture Industry, International Journal of Research in Marketing, Vol 28, Issue 4, December 2011, pp. 367-377.

    Abstract: This article analyzes one key characteristic shared by a growing number of industries. Specifically, their products and services are continuously monitored and evaluated by local third-party ratings systems. In this study, we focus on understanding the local drivers of restrictive age-based ratings in the motion picture industry and the effect of local ratings on a movie's performance at the box office. The results show that there is a significant negative relationship between restrictive ratings and opening weekend box-office performance. However, we find no significant effect with respect to cumulative box-office performance. In the second part of the study, we focus on the local regulatory system's role as a key driver of restrictive age-based ratings in the motion picture industry. Interestingly, the results suggest that the composition of the board that rates the movie plays a key role. Including pediatrics, psychology, or sociology experts in the evaluation board instead of only parents or laypeople has a strong effect and tends to lead to more lenient rating behavior. In addition, we find that larger ratings boards tend to be more restrictive than smaller ones and that industry representation is not necessarily associated with less restrictive ratings. Countries with cultures characterized as uncertainty avoidant, collective, and feminine also seem to be most lenient in their ratings. The implications of the results are discussed from both international marketing and public policy perspectives.

  • Ralf van der Lans, Gerrit van Bruggen, Jehoshua Eliashberg, Berend Wierenga (2010), A Viral Branching Model for Predicting the Spread of Electronic Word of Mouth, Marketing Science, Vol. 29, No.. 2, March-April, pp. 348-365.

    Abstract: In a viral marketing campaign, an organization develops a marketing message and encourages customers to forward this message to their contacts. Despite its increasing popularity, there are no models yet that help marketers to predict how many customers a viral marketing campaign will reach and how marketers can influence this process through marketing activities. This paper develops such a model using the theory of branching processes. The proposed viral branching model allows customers to participate in a viral marketing campaign by (1) opening a seeding e-mail from the organization, (2) opening a viral e-mail from a friend, and (3) responding to other marketing activities such as banners and offline advertising. The model parameters are estimated using individual-level data that become available in large quantities in the early stages of viral marketing campaigns. The viral branching model is applied to an actual viral marketing campaign in which over 200,000 customers participated during a six-week period. The results show that the model quickly predicts the actual reach of the campaign. In addition, the model proves to be a valuable tool to evaluate alternative what-if scenarios.

  • Jehoshua Eliashberg, Quintus Hegie, Jason Ho, Dennis Huisman, Steven J. Miller, Sanjeev Swami, Charles B. Weinberg, Berend Wierenga (2009), Demand-Driven Scheduling of Movies in a Multiplex, International Journal of Research in Marketing, Vol. 26, pp. 75-88.

    Abstract: This paper is about a marketing decision support system in the movie industry. The decision support system of interest is a model that generates weekly movie schedules in a multiplex movie theater. A movie schedule specifies, for each day of the week, on which screen(s) different movies will be played, and at which time(s). The model integrates elements from marketing (the generation of demand figures) with approaches from operations research (the optimization procedure). Therefore, it consists of two parts: (i) conditional forecasts of the number of visitors per show for any possible starting time, and (ii) a scheduling procedure that quickly finds a near optimal schedule (which can be demonstrated to be close to the optimal schedule). To generate this schedule, we formulate the “movie scheduling problem” as a generalized set partitioning problem. The latter is solved with an algorithm based on column generation techniques. We tested the combined demand forecasting/schedule optimization procedure in a multiplex in Amsterdam, generating movie schedules for fourteen weeks. The proposed model not only makes movie scheduling easier and less time consuming, but also generates schedules that attract more visitors than current “intuition-based” schedules.

  • George Knox and Jehoshua Eliashberg (2009), The Consumer’s Rent vs. Buy Decision in the Rentailer, International Journal of Research in Marketing, Vol. 26, pp. 125-135.

    Abstract: In this paper, we focus on the perspective and business model of the rentailer — a retail outlet that rents and sells new and used home video titles. This requires predicting the consumer's decision to rent or buy a particular title, segmenting its customer base, and pricing new and used titles. We develop a new model based on a simple heuristic found in the behavioral marketing literature of how people predict their own usage of a service. We estimate the model using a unique panel dataset obtained from a large rentailer, and find it provides a good fit to the data. Using the model estimates we obtain a metric indicating a latent customer tendency to buy at full price (compared to buying at a lower price or renting). Other diagnostic information from the model may help convert renters into buyers. First, expected viewing may be pitched to the consumer in order to persuade consumers that the movie will be well utilized. Secondly, we use the model to generate customized new and used title prices.

  • Jehoshua Eliashberg, Sanjeev Swami, Charles B. Weinberg, Berend Wierenga (2009), Evolutionary Approach to the Development of Decision Support Systems in the Movie Industry, Decision Support Systems, Vol. 47, pp. 1-12.

    Abstract: This paper reports the development and implementation of a decision support system in a non-traditional domain — the motion picture industry. The approach reported here is evolutionary, and the model was designed to assist exhibition executives in movie scheduling. After an earlier successful collaboration in scheduling a single theater with multiple screens, we now turn to the multi-theater multi screens situation, describing the problems encountered in that situation and how we have dealt with them. Using a quasiexperimental design, the decision support system was estimated to improve the net margin by over US $ 900,000 on an annual basis. The paper describes the implementation process and the performance evaluation metrics that had been agreed upon with the management.

Teaching

Past Courses

  • MKTG212 - DATA & ANLZ FOR MKTG DEC

    Firms have access to detailed data of customers and past marketing actions. Such data may include in-store and online customer transactions, customer surveys as well as prices and advertising. Using real-world applications from various industries, the goal of the course is to familiarize students with several types of managerial problems as well as data sources and techniques, commonly employed in making effective marketing decisions. The course would involve formulating critical managerial problems, developing relevant hypotheses, analyzing data and, most importantly, drawing inferences and telling convincing narratives, with a view of yielding actionable results.

  • MKTG221 - NEW PRODUCT MANAGEMENT

    Examination of the marketing aspects of products or services exclusive of their promotion, pricing or distribution. Focuses on decisions regarding product introduction, positioning, improvements, and deletion, and the tools available for making these decisions.

  • MKTG271 - MODELS FOR MKTG STRATEGY

    In today's business environment, marketing executives are involved in complex decision-making and they become responsible for return on their marketing investments. The first objective of this course is to help participants become better executives. By exposing students to various analytical and computer-based tools, developed for solving marketing problems, it will help to prepare them for careers in industries such as consumer packaged goods, hi-tech, financial services, media and entertainment, pharmaceutical, consulting, and venture capital. The course's main focus is on various existing models, such as models that predict the consumer's dynamic adoption of an innovative product. However, at some point in their career, students may find themselves facing business problems for which a model can assist in making decisions, but no existing model is available. Hence, the second objective of the course is to provide participants with critical skills necessary to evaluate new models to which they may be exposed by attending presentations or reading the literature. The models to be discussed in the class have been implemented and proven useful in a wide range of industries (e.g., business-to-consumers and business-to-business). The course is not only about models, however. It also covers modeling needs. Some industries such as the media and entertainment or the pharmaceutical industries present unique problems and modeling needs. The third objective of the course is to expose participants to the nature and essence of such idiosyncratic problems as well as modeling needs in such industries. Overall, the course will make participants understand better critical marketing problems by analyzing them rigorously and will enhance their skills in either designing or evaluating models-based strategies.

  • MKTG399 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

  • MKTG712 - DATA & ANLZ FOR MKTG DEC

    Firms have access to detailed data of customers and past marketing actions. Such data may include in-store and online customer transactions, customer surveys as well as prices and advertising. Using real-world applications from various industries, the goal of the course is to familiarize students with several types of managerial problems as well as data sources and techniques, commonly employed in making effective marketing decisions. The course would involve formulating critical managerial problems, developing relevant hypotheses, analyzing data and, most importantly, drawing inferences and telling convincing narratives, with a view of yielding actionable results.

  • MKTG771 - MODELS FOR MKTG STRATEGY

    In today's business environment, marketing executives are involved in complex decision-making and they become responsible for return on their marketing investments. The first objective of this course is to help participants become better executives. By exposing students to various analytical and computer-based tools, developed for solving marketing problems, it will help to prepare them for careers in industries such as consumer packaged goods, hi-tech, financial services, media and entertainment, pharmaceutical, consulting, and venture capital. The course's main focus is on various existing models, such as models that predict the consumer's dynamic adoption of an innovative product. However, at some point in their career, students may find themselves facing business problems for which a model can assist in making decisions, but no existing model is available. Hence, the second objective of the course is to provide participants with critical skills necessary to evaluate new models to which they may be exposed by attending presentations or reading the literature. The models to be discussed in the class have been implemented and proven useful in a wide range of industries (e.g., business-to-consumers and business-to-business). The course is not only about models, however. It also covers modeling needs. Some industries such as the media and entertainment or the pharmaceutical industries present unique problems and modeling needs. The third objective of the course is to expose participants to the nature and essence of such idiosyncratic problems as well as modeling needs in such industries. Overall, the course will make participants understand better critical marketing problems by analyzing them rigorously and will enhance their skills in either designing or evaluating models-based strategies.

  • MKTG890 - ADVANCED STUDY PROJECT

    RETAIL ECOSYSTEM ACTION LEARNING PROJECTS: This course offers graduate students from Wharton and other Penn schools an opportunity to work on real-world projects for companies in the retail industry and in the wider retail ecosystem. It requires the exploration and analysis of actual business issues or opportunities identified by sponsoring/client companies, as well as the formulation of recommendations. It combines 1) academic principles, 2) application of prior business knowledge to the project at hand, and 3) a solutions-oriented mentality. In addition to supervised project work and regular updates to the corporate client/project sponsor, the course involves classroom meetings and discussions on topics pertaining to the projects. While this course focuses on "marketing" topics, projects might also incorporate topics from related disciplines such as operations, management of innovation & technology, data analytics, international management, design, and real estate. Indeed, the goal will be to constitute interdisciplinary teams from Wharton and other relevant Penn graduate schools. ADVANCED STUDY PROJECT (GENERAL): The principal objectives of this course are to provide opportunities for undertaking an in-depth study of a marketing problem and to develop the students' skills in evaluating research and designing marketing strategies for a variety of management situations. Selected projects can touch on any aspect of marketing as long as this entails the elements of problem structuring, data collection, data analysis, and report preparation. The course entails a considerable amount of independent work. (Strict library-type research is not appropriate) Class sessions are used to monitor progress on the project and provide suggestions for the research design and data analysis. The last portion of the course often includes an oral presentation by each group to the rest of the class and project sponsors. Along with marketing, the projects integrate other elements of management such as finance, production, research and development, and human resources.

  • MKTG897 - ADVANCED STUDY

    New retail brands and opportunities for growth are emerging at an unprecedented rate, for online retailers and offline retailers alike. In this course we will: (1) articulate key principles for successful branding and for understanding consumer shopping behavior in retail environments, (2) demonstrate unique challenges and opportunities that luxury brands face, and (3) discuss concepts and empirical methods for analyzing consumer shopping behavior.

  • MKTG899 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    A student contemplating an independent study project must first find a faculty member who agrees to supervise and approve the student's written proposal as an independent study (MKTG 899). If a student wishes the proposed work to be used to meet the ASP requirement, he/she should then submit the approved proposal to the MBA adviser who will determine if it is an appropriate substitute. Such substitutions will only be approved prior to the beginning of the semester.

  • MKTG995 - DISSERTATION

  • MKTG999 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Requires written permission of instructor and the department graduate adviser.

Awards and Honors

In the News

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Activity

Latest Research

Grant Packard, Anocha Aribarg, Jehoshua Eliashberg, Natasha Foutz (2016), The Role of Network Embeddeness in Film Success, International Journal of Research in Marketing, 33 (2), pp. 328-342.
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In the News

Will MoviePass Have a Happy Ending?

Is the theater ticket subscription service an offer you can’t refuse – or too good to be true?

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/05/8
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