Uri Barnea

Uri Barnea
  • Doctoral Student

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    700 Jon M. Huntsman Hall, 3730 Walnut Street
    University of Pennsylvania
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: Information Processing, Word of Mouth, Judgment and Decision Making, Consumer Well-Being

Overview

Uri joined the Wharton Marketing Doctoral Program in Fall 2014. He received his B.A. in Psychology from IDC (Herzliya, Israel).

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Research

  • Uri Barnea, Robert Meyer, Gideon Nave, You Only Get One Shot: Restricting the Number of Times Consumers Can Access Content Increases Their Resource Allocation During Information Processing.

    Abstract: Many social media platforms, including leading apps such as Snapchat, Facebook Messenger and Telegram, limit the number of times audience can view content. We investigate how this restriction affects processing of received information. Building on the notion that people strategically allocate cognitive resources (Schneider and Shiffrin 1977), we propose that receivers increase resource allocation when processing information that they cannot reexamine. In six pre-registered studies (N = 7,048) we demonstrate that restricting people to a single view (vs. multiple views) leads to increased attention, better content recall (both cued and free recall), improved comprehension, and more favorable attitudes towards the content, as well as longer voluntary viewing time, both of the content and of ads preceding it. These results suggest that marketers can affect meaningful metrics by communicating with consumers via channels that limit their repeated access to the message.

  • Hal E. Hershfield, Cassie Mogilner, Uri Barnea (2016), People Who Choose Time Over Money Are Happier, Social Psychological and Personality Science, 7 (September), pp. 697-706. 10.1177/1948550616649239

    Abstract: Money and time are both scarce resources that people believe would bring them greater happiness. But would people prefer having more money or more time? And how does one’s preference between resources relate to happiness? Across studies, we asked thousands of Americans whether they would prefer more money or more time. Although the majority of people chose more money, choosing more time was associated with greater happiness—even controlling for existing levels of available time and money. Additional studies and experiments provide insight into choosers’ underlying rationale and the causal direction of the effect.

Teaching

Past Courses

  • MKTG101 - INTRO TO MARKETING

    The objective of this course is to introduce students to the concepts, analyses, and activities that comprise marketing management, and to provide practice in assessing and solving marketing problems. The course is also a foundation for advanced electives in Marketing as well as other business/social disciplines. Topics include marketing strategy, customer behavior, segmentation, market research, product management, pricing, promotion, sales force management and competitive analysis.

Activity

Latest Research

Uri Barnea, Robert Meyer, Gideon Nave, You Only Get One Shot: Restricting the Number of Times Consumers Can Access Content Increases Their Resource Allocation During Information Processing.
All Research