Rom Y. Schrift

Rom Y. Schrift
  • Assistant Professor of Marketing

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    766 Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    3730 Walnut Street
    University of Pennsylvania
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: consumer’s decisional conflict and effort in choice, empathy and social influence, preference formation and choice

Links: CV

Overview

Professor Rom Schrift is an assistant professor of Marketing at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He earned his PhD in Marketing and Master’s in Philosophy from Columbia University Business School.

Professor Schrift studies consumer behavior focusing on judgment and decision making. More specifically, he explores the psychological processes that consumers undergo prior to reaching a decision, the formation of consumers’ preferences, and the roles of decisional-conflict and effort in choice. His work has been published in top-tier academic journals, including Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of Experimental Psychology, and Psychological Science. Professor Schrift’s research won several prestigious awards and recognitions, including multiple “Best Paper” awards, and the finalist for the recent “2016 William F. O’Dell Award.” He currently teaches systematic approaches to creativity at the Wharton School.

Professor Schrift teaches Creativity (MKTG 234/734) and Consumer Behavior (MKTG 211). He earned his MBA from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a B.Sc. in Engineering from Ben-Gurion University in Israel. Prior to his academic career, he worked as an R&D Engineer and as a consultant in the field of marketing research.

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Research

  • Rom Y. Schrift, Jeffrey R. Parker, Gal Zauberman, Shalena Srna (2018), Multi-Stage Decisions Processes: The Impact of Attribute-Order on How Consumers Mentally Represent Their Choice, Journal of Consumer Research, 44 (6), pp. 1307-1324.

  • Eva Ascarza, Scott Neslin, Oded Netzer, Zachery Anderson, Peter Fader, Sunil Gupta, Bruce Hardie, Aurelie Lemmens, Barak Libai, David Neal, Foster Provost, Rom Y. Schrift (2018), In Pursuit of Enhanced Customer Retention Management: Review, Key Issues, and Future Directions, Customer Needs and Solutions, 17.

  • Yimin Cheng, Anirban Mukhopadhyay, Rom Y. Schrift (2017), Do Costly Options Lead to Better Outcomes? How the Protestant Work Ethic Influences the Cost-Benefit Heuristic in Goal Pursuit, Journal of Marketing Research, 54 (4), pp. 636-649. https://doi.org/10.1509/jmr.15.0105

  • Shalena Srna, Rom Y. Schrift, Gal Zauberman (Forthcoming), The Illusion of Multitasking and Its Positive Effect on Performance.

    Description: Forthcoming at Psychological Science.

  • Shalena Srna, Gal Zauberman, Rom Y. Schrift (Work In Progress), A Prediction Gap in Effect of Income Tax on Effort.

  • Yonat Zwebner and Rom Y. Schrift (Work In Progress), Conspicuous Conflict: how being observed while Making Tradeoffs Impacts Consumers’ Choice and Why.

  • Yonat Zwebner and Rom Y. Schrift (Work In Progress), The Pain of Choice: Preference Elicitation Modes, Effort and Conflict.

  • Rom Y. Schrift, Ran Kivetz, Oded Netzer (2016), Complicating Decisions: The Work Ethic Heuristic and the Construction of Effortful Decisions, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145 (7), pp. 807-829.

  • Rom Y. Schrift and Moty Amar (2015), Pain and Preferences: Observed Decisional Conflict and the Convergence of Preferences, Journal of Consumer Research.

    Abstract: Decision making often entails conflict. In many situations, the symptoms of such decisional conflict are conspicuous. This paper explores an important and unexamined question: How does observing someone else experiencing decisional conflict impact our own preferences? The authors show that observing others’ emotional conflict and agony over an impending decision makes the observer’s preferences converge to those of the conflicted actor (i.e., choose similarly). Thus, this paper contributes to the social influence literature by demonstrating that observers’ preferences are not only influenced by an actor’s ultimate choice, but also by the process leading to this choice. For example, in one experiment, participants' real monetary donations to one of two charities converged to those of a paid confederate that agonized over the decision. Six studies demonstrate this effect and show that it is triggered by empathy and a greater sense of shared identity with the conflicted actor. Accordingly, the studies show the effect is more pronounced for individuals with a greater tendency to empathize with others, and that convergence occurs only if participants deem the actor’s conflict warranted given the decision at hand. The authors also demonstrate important implications of this effect in contexts of group decision-making.

  • Rom Y. Schrift and Jeffrey R. Parker (2014), Staying the Course: The Option of Doing Nothing and Its Impact on Post-Choice Persistence, Psychological Science, 25 (3), pp. 772-780.

    Abstract: Individuals regularly face adversity in the pursuit of goals that require ongoing commitment. Whether or not an individual persists in the face of said adversity greatly affects the likelihood that this individual will achieve his goal. The authors argue that a seemingly minor change in the individual’s original choice set—specifically, the addition of a no-choice option—will increase persistence along the chosen path. Drawing on self-perception theory, it is proposed that choosing from a set that includes a no-choice (do nothing) option informs the individual that he both prefers the chosen path to other(s) and that he considers this path alone to be worth pursuing: an inference that cannot be made in the absence of a no-choice option. This unique information strengthens the individual’s commitment toward his chosen path, and increases persistence. Three studies employing incentive-compatible designs support the authors’ predictions and rule out several rival accounts.

Teaching

Past Courses

  • MKTG211 - CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

    This course is concerned with how and why people behave as consumers. Its goals are to: (1) provide conceptual understanding of consumer behavior, (2) provide experience in the application of buyer behavior concepts to marketing management decisions and social policy decision-making; and (3) to develop analytical capability in using behavioral research.

  • MKTG234 - CREATIVITY

    The ability to solve problems creatively and generate change is a recognized standard of success and plays an important role in gaining a competitive advantage in many areas of business management. This course is designed to teach students several creative problem solving methodologies that complement other managerial tools acquired in undergraduate and graduate studies. The course offers students the opportunity to learn how to solve problems, identify opportunities, and generate those elusive ideas that potentially generate enormous benefits to organizations. The objectives of this course are to enhance the students' (a) creativity, (b) ability to innovate and (c) ability to identify, recruit, develop, manage, retain, and collaborate with creative people. The course includes: 1. A review of the literature on creativity, creative people, innovation, and design as well as the leadership and management of creative people and innovation. 2. Hands on learning of approaches for generating creative ideas. Students will have the opportunity of implementing the techniques studied in class. 3. Applications of creativity to selected management domains - Approaches to the generation of creative options are not limited to the development of products and services or businesses, but can be applied to all areas of management, business, and life. The purpose of these sessions is to explore the applications of creative approaches to marketing, advertising, organizational design, negotiations, and other management challenges. 4. Integration - Both via individual assignments and a group project in which interdisciplinary teams of students generate a creative product/service/customer.

  • MKTG292 - CREATIVITY

    The ability to solve problems creatively and generate change is a recognized standard of success and plays an important role in gaining a competitive advantage in many areas of business management. This course is designed to teach students several creative problem solving methodologies that complement other managerial tools acquired in undergraduate and graduate studies. The course offers students the opportunity to learn how to solve problems, identify opportunities, and generate those elusive ideas that potentially generate enormous benefits to organizations. The objectives of this course are to enhance the student's (a) creativity (b) ability to innovate and (c) ability to identify, recruit, develop, manage, retain, and collaborate with creative people. The course includes: interaction with guest lecturers; a review of the literature on creativity, creative people, innovation, and design as well as the leadership and management of creative people and innovation; hands on learning of approaches for generating creative ideas; applications of creativity to selected management domains; and integration via individual assignments and a group project in which interdisciplinary teams of students generate a creative product, service, customer experience, business or strategy.

  • MKTG734 - CREATIVITY

    The ability to solve problems creatively and generate change is a recognized standard of success and plays an important role in gaining a competitive advantage in many areas of business management. This course is designed to teach students several creative problem solving methodologies that complement other managerial tools acquired in undergraduate and graduate studies. The course offers students the opportunity to learn how to solve problems, identify opportunities, and generate those elusive ideas that potentially generate enormous benefits to organizations. The objectives of this course are to enhance the students' (a) creativity, (b) ability to innovate and (c) ability to identify, recruit, develop, manage, retain, and collaborate with creative people. The course includes: 1. A review of the literature on creativity, creative people, innovation, and design as well as the leadership and management of creative people and innovation. 2. Hands on learning of approaches for generating creative ideas. Students will have the opportunity of implementing the techniques studied in class. 3. Applications of creativity to selected management domains - Approaches to the generation of creative options are not limited to the development of products and services or businesses, but can be applied to all areas of management, business, and life. The purpose of these sessions is to explore the applications of creative approaches to marketing, advertising, organizational design, negotiations, and other management challenges. 4. Integration - Both via individual assignments and a group project in which interdisciplinary teams of students generate a creative product/service/customer

  • MKTG995 - DISSERTATION

Awards and Honors

  • “Top 40 Undergraduate Professors,” Poets & Quants Selection, 2017
  • 2017 Excellence in Teaching Award, Undergraduate Division, The Wharton School, 2017
  • Marketing Science Institute Young Scholar, 2017
  • Finalist, William F. O’Dell Award, Journal of Marketing Research, 2016
  • The Franco Nicosia ACR Best Competitive Paper Award, 2015
  • The Claude Marion Endowed Faculty Scholar Award, 2014-2015
  • Dean’s Research Grant, 2014
  • 2014 Excellence in Teaching Award, Undergraduate Division, The Wharton School, 2014
  • 2012 Excellence in Teaching Award, Undergraduate Division, The Wharton School, 2012
  • AMA / John A. Howard, Doctoral Dissertation Competition, Honorable Mention, 2011
  • Mary Kay Doctoral Dissertation Competition, Honorable Mention, 2011
  • Best Competitive Paper Award, Society for Consumer Psychology, 2010
  • Best Student Paper Award, Society for Consumer Psychology, 2010

In the News

Knowledge @ Wharton

Activity

Latest Research

Rom Y. Schrift, Jeffrey R. Parker, Gal Zauberman, Shalena Srna (2018), Multi-Stage Decisions Processes: The Impact of Attribute-Order on How Consumers Mentally Represent Their Choice, Journal of Consumer Research, 44 (6), pp. 1307-1324.
All Research

In the News

The Real (and Imaginary) Benefits of Multitasking

New Wharton research finds that the perception of multitasking seems to be beneficial to performance.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2017/12/26
All News

Awards and Honors

“Top 40 Undergraduate Professors,” Poets & Quants Selection 2017
All Awards